Fiverr Review: Scam or legit, tips and my experience

Fiverr Review: Scam or legit, tips and my experience

Is using Fiverr (fiverr.com) worth it? Is Fiverr a scam? Is Fiverr safe?

These are all good questions. In short, for outsourcing small jobs, YES, the platform is worth it. If you want to know if Fiverr is a scam or safe to use, I can only draw conclusions from my personal experience, which is a good one. This question is ultimately determined by who you choose to hire to complete your work.

Please more great content you say? Should You Be Dropshipping in 2018? My Experience

I discuss below what ‘gigs’ I have bought on the platform, how they turned out and offer some tips to ensure you receive a good service.

What is Fiverr?


Fiverr is an online freelance marketplace, where services are bought and sold for fairly cheap. It’s free to use, buyers pay sellers for services and Fiverr takes a cut of the sale. Originally, most of the gigs (services) were $5 hence the name.

Gigs come in all sorts of formats from graphics, design and marketing to animated GIFs, palm reading and relationship advice(!). Isn’t the internet great.

It’s been around for 10 years already and has completed many millions of transactions to date, so it clearly works. Other popular platforms are available however, I don’t have personal experience with them. For your reference check out:

How does Fiverr work?


As I’ve alluded to, freelancers list gigs for sale. Prospective buyers who need jobs doing will search for, and buy these gigs.

The freelancers are not vetted, thus the skill level and professionalism on show varies greatly. Use the review system to filter only well regarded sellers.

Look for sellers with 200+ reviews and a rating of 4.8 stars or higher.

Read lots of the reviews to decide if they are suitable for you. Social proof is the only way of concluding if the individual is appropriately skilled and reliable.

The saying, ‘you get what you pay for’ is somewhat apt in this scenario. My advice would be to avoid the seller with the cheapest offer.

What gigs I’ve used and how they turned out


In short, I’ve used 3 types of gig, they all delivered exactly what they claimed to.

1. Influencer marketing

Seller: 4.9-star rating, 200+ reviews.

Gig: Product promotion to social media audience of size 500,000.

Price: Around £20

Results: My linked product received 750+ clicks over a period of 7 days. Whether or not you deem that a success will be dependent on your conversion rate. Consider a 2% conversion rate with a £8 profit margin per sale. So, 15 sales x £8 – cost of gig = £100 profit.

This gives an Advertising Cost of Sale (ACOS) of 20/15 = £1.33 per item. Useful but not ground-breaking. Could be scaled up if happy with ACOS.  

Recommended: Yes, nothing to lose.

2. Web traffic

Seller: 5-star rating, 5k+ reviews.

Gig: Keyword targeted website traffic for 30 days.

Price: Around £20

Results: My chosen keywords and website pages started receiving in the region of 300 visitors daily. This is exactly what the gig was offering, it therefore delivered. However, don’t expect any interaction with your website content or links.

I was hoping (perhaps optimistic of me), that a small minority might interact. They did not. Session times were in the region of 30 secs – I’ll leave you to draw your conclusions regards the nature of the traffic.

If you are just after website traffic, then there are no complaints here. However, don’t expect anything more.

Recommended: Yes, if it’s just raw traffic you require.

3. Logo design

Seller: 5-star rating, 1k+ reviews.

Gig: Logo design with revisions.

Price: Around £20

Results: This was largely an experiment, I like to design my own artwork using photoshop. I expect the comments section will blow up with people surprised that I don’t pay millions for it. However, I was intrigued to see what was possible with a small outlay of £20.

From what I can gather the artwork was original. It was of a very reasonable standard and the seller managed to meet my requirements. If you have a very limited graphic design ability, I would wholeheartedly recommend a low-cost service like this. Otherwise consider using it as a source of inspiration to generate ideas.

Recommended: Yes

Other recommended gigs


Use Fiverr for low-cost, small jobs. I would never consider giving away cash, my passwords and access rights to sellers that I’ve never met on the internet. You should do the same.

Here are some other gigs that have worked out well for others I know:

Spokesperson video – You can get a very professional short video for around £30. Simple, but fantastic value and results for the price. Here’s an example:

Proofreading and Editing – If you’re short for time, you can hire someone to proofread and edit anything (spelling/grammar etc) for £5 a go.

Video of Donald Trump signing your logo – Get Donald Trump to sign whatever you like for £12. This is sure to rocket your business to the moon and back – money well spent!

If Trump won’t do it for you read this RateSetter Review: How to Make 15% in 12 Months with Peer-to-Peer Lending

Parting thoughts and tips


Fiverr is a great resource. Don’t let anyone tell you it’s a ‘scam’, but do be savvy with who you hire and keep to less complex jobs to minimise potential for monkey business. To conclude:

  • Create an account at Fiverr.com and browse for a gig.
  • Outsource work that is simple and costs under £50.
  • Look for sellers with 200+ reviews and a 4.8+ star rating.
  • Manage your expectations – this is a marketplace to get jobs done on the cheap.
  • Use local professionals for complex or expensive work.
  • Get something signed by Donald Trump.

That’s all, I hope you found this quick Fiverr review useful – happy outsourcing!

Take care,

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